The Importance and Presence of God in the Tabernacle #24

The Importance and Presence of God in the Tabernacle #24

The tabernacle was first intended for the reservation of the Eucharist in a worthy place so that it could be brought to the sick and those absent outside of Mass. As faith in the real presence of Christ in his Eucharist deepened, the Church became conscious of the meaning of silent adoration of the Lord present under the Eucharistic species. It is for this reason that the tabernacle should be located in an especially worthy place in the church and should be constructed in such a way that it emphasizes and manifests the truth of the real presence of Christ in the Blessed Sacrament. (CCC, 1379)

From The Catechism of the Catholic Church

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Signs and Symbols #22

Signs and Symbols #22

Signs and symbols

1145 A sacramental celebration is woven from signs and symbols. In keeping with the divine pedagogy of salvation, their meaning is rooted in the work of creation and in human culture, specified by the events of the Old Covenant and fully revealed in the person and work of Christ.

1146 Signs of the human world. In human life, signs and symbols occupy an important place. As a being at once body and spirit, man expresses and perceives spiritual realities through physical signs and symbols. As a social being, man needs signs and symbols to communicate with others, through language, gestures, and actions. The same holds true for his relationship with God.

1147 God speaks to man through the visible creation. The material cosmos is so presented to man’s intelligence that he can read there traces of its Creator.16 Light and darkness, wind and fire, water and earth, the tree and its fruit speak of God and symbolize both his greatness and his nearness.

1148 Inasmuch as they are creatures, these perceptible realities can become means of expressing the action of God who sanctifies men, and the action of men who offer worship to God. The same is true of signs and symbols taken from the social life of man: washing and anointing, breaking bread and sharing the cup can express the sanctifying presence of God and man’s gratitude toward his Creator.

Excerpt from the Catechism of the Catholic Church

Architecture #21

Architecture #21

“We seek to restore the practice of a sacred architecture because it is part of our Catholic patrimony, in the same way that images of the Annunciation, Last Supper, and Crucifixion are. they are a catechism in paint, mosaic, and stone.” (Introduction, 1)

“By placing icons within aedicules, testers over the Blessed Sacrament, and baldacchinos over the altar, the architecture focuses our attention on the sacred elements.” (Introduction, 3).

 

Excerpts from The Church Building as a Sacred Place: Beauty, Transcendence, and the Eternal

Beauty According to Cardinal Ratzinger #18

Beauty According to Cardinal Ratzinger #18

“Whoever believes in God, in the God who manifested himself, precisely in the altered appearance of Christ crucified as love “to the end” (Jn 13,1), knows that beauty is truth and truth beauty;”

 

Excerpt from

MESSAGE OF HIS EMINENCE CARD. JOSEPH RATZINGER
TO THE COMMUNION AND LIBERATION (CL)
MEETING AT RIMINI (24-30 AUGUST 2002)

“The Feeling of Things, the Contemplation of Beauty”